Adding muscle where it counts – Introduction

THIS IS A COURSE INVOLVING FIGURES. IT WILL TEACH YOU HOW TO TRANSFORM YOURS INTO MORE PLEASING DIMENSIONS THROUGH THE SCIENCE OF BODYSHAPING. STUDY THIS ASSIGNMENT, SELECT THE PROPER ROUTINE, AND APPLY YOURSELF. NO CHEATING.

Over wished you could do some major remodeling on your bodylike scaling down your hips or adding to your bustline? Ever wanted to look more balanced, with a proportional figure?

building muscleGaining better dimensions is possible. in addition to building strength, weight training can develop symmetry-a figure that’s aesthetically pleasing. No body parts overdeveloped or underdeveloped at the expense of others. Body parts that are toned, well-formed, and ordered. The symmetrical body looks as though it was molded from a single piece of clay, not patched together with separate lumps. The word most often used to describe weight training for symmetry is bodyshaping. When combined with good nutrition, bodyshaping adds contour and tone where there was none before. It can bring out some body parts more than others, creating the illusion of an ideal figure. Whether you call it bodyshaping or weight training, exercising with weights remodels the body in subtle, attractive ways. “Just as you can use clothes to hide or accentuate certain body parts, you can tailor your muscles to highlight your overall physique,” says Robert Kennedy, my co-author on Built!

The New Bodybuilding For Everyone and the author of 20 other books on weight training. “Add a bit here, take away there, and before long, a more-balanced physique will emerge.” How you achieve this depends largely on the way you train. You can “spot shape” a certain body part, for instance. Simply target the muscles of that area in your workout and challenge them accordingly. That way, lagging out-of-shape muscle groups get extra attention. Intensity-your level of effort-is equally important. By exercising with light weights and high repetitions, for example, you’ll tone and tighten muscles without adding size. Train with progressively heavier weights and low reps and your muscles become fuller and more defined. Muscle size can be added in areas that need extra curves.

The prospect of gaining muscle size still scares many women-those under the impression that heavyweight training produces the muscle-bound look that male weight trainers get. This notion is definitely a myth. Women have much less of the male hormone testosterone in their bodies than men do. (Testosterone is responsible for the development of a man’s secondary sex characteristics.) Women, therefore, can no more build big muscles than they can grow a beard (unless they rely on steroids, as some female bodybuilders do). Some new research sheds even more light on this issue. The degree to which muscles enlarge from weight training (called hypertrophy) depends on the size and number of muscle fibers you’re born with, according to researchers at the University of Georgia.

Men have larger muscle fibers-and more of them-than women do. It follows, then, that a man’s muscles, when weight trained, will look bigger because the size and number of muscle fibers are greater to begin with. So rest assured: Your muscles won’t get any bigger than your genetic blueprint allows. If you do gain what you think is too much muscle, stop working out temporarily. Your muscles will shrink back to their pre-trained condition. (Contrary to what many people think, unworked muscle does not turn into fat. Fat and muscle are two entirely different types of body tissue.) The point is, you control how much or how little muscle you develop by the work you do in the gym.

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